Does anyone download anymore?

Often during the last year when I wanted to check out interesting bands, I just went to Youtube or Myspace to listen to their music. There is no files to download and no music to own. This is very convenient, very legal and has major effects on the idea of selling-buying-owning music. When all music is available for free at servers that the artist controls, there is unlimited access to the ultimate music collection, that we all share. This is very nice for a listener, but maybe not as good for the musicians.

As the musical inflation accelerates, there is so much so available music that no one really cares. As we dont even have to do the small effort of downloading, this could lead to an economic disaster for musicians who feels they have to giva away more and more for free by just releasing it all on their sites.

I like this movement in many ways, but are there any solution for musicians who wants to make some money? My own ideas are live gigs and attractive digital solutions. Gigs can be magical and will always be worth a lot to an audience. And who gets to shag in front of a computer screen anyway? Good digital solutions, like our Web Album, with interactivity, contact between the artists and fans, and such attempts will be attempted, I hope some of them will prevail.

Not to forget the people who really likes the idea of ownership. I read that vinyl records is a new trend, as they are attractive, sound great and has this physical beauty of large artwork, great smell and magic touch… Myself, I dont own a grammophone at the moment, but its a high priority when the money comes rolling (some day).

So for the future, I bet there is a physical trend with great products, and a non-ownership-listeners culture, directly on the web. Maybe the biggest loser in the future will be file downloading.

Here is a swedish article on the subject: http://www.svd.se/kulturnoje/nyheter/artikel_1565053.svd

Advertisements

11 Responses to “Does anyone download anymore?”


  1. 1 bobby100m August 15, 2008 at 6:59 pm

    There is a website that follows the idea of letting the artist keep full control, all rights and maximum profit of their content: Filmbay.com

    Their platform is open to artists, bands, filmmakers and many other indy content creators:

    Here is the press release I got from a friend:

    Filmbay Launches the First Online Film Marketplace & Self Distribution
    System

    Filmbay, Ltd. (Cd/b/a Filmbay), with the URL http://www.Filmbay.com,
    announces the launch of the first Internet marketplace for worldwide buyers
    and sellers to search and option feature motion pictures, short films,
    documentaries, music videos, music, screenplays and more. In addition,
    filmmakers, sound composers and others can sell their titles individually as
    DVD, CD or other formats via an online shop and auction.

    Never before has the global film industry had a centralized online
    marketplace, communications centre, distribution outlet and community in one
    website. As a result, the independent film industry was once scattered all
    over the world. Writers, Actors, Directors, Music Composers had been
    separated not only geographically by country, but even more so by being
    represented by a guild, union, or agent which often imposed limits on their
    ability to engage in independent film production worldwide. Filmbay erases
    these limits. The idea of creating such this important Internet venue
    originated with Filmbay’s founder and President, John Paul Trutnau, and his
    personal assessment of the current global film marketing process:

    “I was tired of always hearing the same complaints from filmmakers, actors,
    writers and other artists of not being able to find true global
    representation for their work and for themselves.” says John-Paul.

    “The Internet offers a unique way to unite people from all over the world in one media platform and create a global market place.” It took over 3 years to develop and fine tune the Filmbay concept and website. “Filmbay is similar to a Hollywood Studio, minus the hierarchies, but offers better opportunities for directors and producers to showcase, distribute and sell their products.

    Jorn Ross, a university graduate and computer programmer, as well as
    Sanka Abeysinghe, a graphic and web designer, assisted Trutnau in making his
    project come alive. And now Filmbay allows buyers and sellers of film, as
    well as general consumers who are interested in new and independent
    cinematic products, to come together in a unique and innovative setting.

    The website also enables global communication among all members who are
    actively involved in the process of making a film. In this way, Filmbay
    becomes a one-stop shop for the global independent film community. It even
    features a Pitch Area where new projects are presented to this highly
    dynamic film community who are looking to get involved.

    Is Filmbay only for filmmakers? “Not at all, Filmbay is open to all creative aspects that relate to film, so for example a music composer or rock band can sell their own CD on our site, without a big label behind it.”

    Additionally, academics can publish their work, e.g. an essay, M.A. or PhD
    Thesis related to media studies. All Filmbay members can post their bio and
    Showcase, even sell their work online. Job Forums, Classifieds and filmmaking tips are also available.

    “Film Creation and Film Consumption should be fun, if possible. Nowadays the hierarchies among the film production teams are shifting – that is what our website is all about: to offer your services to each other on an open platform.” By uniting all creative forces on one platform there are so many new opportunities to communicate and collaborate.

    And since Filmbay is always online, it provides a 24/7 platform for the
    independent film community to come together, exchange, collaborate and
    communicate, as well as buy and sell films, scripts, music and more.

    For more information, visit Filmbay at:

    http://www.filmbay.com

    AP2 02602
    Reuters 3-20163c

  2. 2 alleee August 16, 2008 at 1:28 am

    I think that the only people who gain anything when the files cannot be shared are shareholders in large music companies like Sony, etc. The RIAA, claiming to represent musicians, has rarely paid musicians anything from lawsuits. They even go so far as to claim they “cannot find” well-known music groups.

    However, sharing music has been a boon to music itself, in that a wide array of musicians who produce for themselves can advertise, produce and sell music for a very low cost, eliminating the need to be “discovered” by an industry that tends to throw away young musicians when they are no longer what they think of as salable. Musicians find themselves exposed to people from all over the globe, not just in their own countries. Genres are linked, and linked again, exposing the styles to listeners who may not have been interested in a particular genre before.

    The music industry must “get with the program” and realize that people do not listen to and consume music the way the companies want us to. With the internet, they cannot tell us how we must listen anymore. Not if we know how to make our entertainment ourselves.

  3. 3 Gary August 16, 2008 at 3:35 pm

    For two or three years now I have subscribed to Napster, £10 a month for totally open streaming access to their couple of million tracks, I think of it as my own personal jukebox, I don’t need to download the tracks, I don’t want to “own” them I just want to listen to them and have open access to them – Napster does all that and its totally legal.

    The only people who still want us to pay for every piece of music that we listen to are of course the large record companies, they have paid millions of dollars to hold the copyrights and can see how their investments may be looking a little silly now that we don’t need to shop with them to listen to their stock – unfortunately businesses like theirs are slow to move with the times, but they will have to, eventually.

  4. 4 kristofer August 17, 2008 at 9:01 am

    the problem is the audio quality of streaming services etc. It’s not exactly lossless or anywhere near cd quality. I want to listen to music on my home stereo/multi-ch equipment, and streaming via Napster, Spotify etc sounds crap. Filesharing of lossless formats is so much bigger, and growing much faster, than streaming services.

  5. 5 Niall August 17, 2008 at 11:48 am

    I think it’s interesting to remember that actually making recordings of music is a very recent phenomenon. Hopefully it will go away soon. For many thousands of years it was musicians who played music. Now it is CD/mp3 players that play music. They play it like a machine, in the very same way, over and over again. How dull is that…

  6. 6 Mandy August 29, 2008 at 10:37 am

    Yeah … just like the printed books! It’s a very recent phenomenon. Gutenberg mede it possible in the 16th century, to hell with him! Before that, it was storytellers who told the stories, now it’s done by dead trees. And it tells the story like dead trees does, in the very same way over and over again. How dull!

  7. 7 Ludophile August 31, 2008 at 11:57 am

    Please read up on subject-verb agreement, it’s almost impossoble to read your writing when you keep making mistakes like “musicians who wants” and “people who likes”.

    Also, anyone who can find even half of the music they like online has tastes that are WAY too mainstream.

  8. 8 sandrar September 10, 2009 at 1:05 pm

    Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post… nice! I love your blog. 🙂 Cheers! Sandra. R.

  9. 9 GramtonePelle September 10, 2009 at 1:34 pm

    Thanks a bunch, Sandra! That kind of comment is needed now and then.
    /Pelle

  10. 10 black celebs August 10, 2010 at 6:32 pm

    Sign: wdpad Hello!!! uyrsx and 7658shchfeqygg and 1190 : I love your blog. 🙂 I just came across your blog.


  1. 1 how to download free mp3 music Trackback on August 16, 2008 at 2:53 am

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




Gramtone

Gramtone är musikutgivare och bas för ett gäng musiker och låtskrivare, baserade i Norrköping. Vi äger bolaget och studion tillsammans, folk med olika bakgrund och olika smak. Två dussin är vi, som ställer allt vi äger i ett rum och säger: varsågoda. Ett kollektiv av individualister har vi kallats, och varför inte: Grammisar har vunnits, stipendier har fåtts, medan somliga är kända för helt andra saker. Alla spelar roll, men inte nödvändigtvis rock. En driver ett enmansprojekt, en annan är med i fem band samtidigt. Några är runt 20, några har fyllt 50. En fick pris för årets bästa museum. Någon ligger bakom Softubes banbrytande pluggar och någon har fått utmärkelse för, hör och häpna, bästa fotbollslåt.

Gramtone satsar på en liten, spännande utgivning av ostyrig, vacker musik. Lyssna där du vill, vi finns i alla de vedertagna kanalerna. Vissa spelar live, andra spelar in. Några älskar att skriva låtar, andra spelar gitarr så fingrarna blöder. Gramtone är en plattform som används av varje band och artist som det passar dem bäst. Ibland är vi en lekplats, ibland kreativt nav, affärsyta eller en trampolin för musikkarriärer. Vi blir planterade och uppodlade av varandra, och vi gillar't. Vi tycker att musik gör tillvaron större och vill man att något ska finnas, då ska man också skapa det. Tre dussin utgivningar hittills, och mycket på gång. Titta in, lyssna in, och häng med.


%d bloggers like this: